This blog is about serial killers, the psychology behind them and everything serial killer related. I also occasionally post psychology stuff.

I have had an obsession with serial killers since I was 11 and have spend a lot of my time researching them.

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(Source: t3d-bundy, via guns-god-government)

Saturday Apr 21 @ 10:31pm with 252 notes



(Source: t3d-bundy, via calygula-deactivated20120709)

Friday Apr 20 @ 10:31pm with 90 notes


serial-killers-101:

Gordon Northcott
In February of 1928 the headless corpse of a small boy was discovered in a ditch in Puente, California. When two more Mexican boys, brothers aged eight and ten, went missing later that spring, investigators soon focused on Gordon Northcott. The ranchowner from Riverside made his guilt obvious by immediately fleeing to Canada. Police found the head of the boy found in Puente during their search of Northcott’s isolated home and soon arrested his teenaged nephew and his mother, Sarah, both of whom admitted assisting Northcott with the crimes. Found and extradited back to the US, Northcott went to trial with his nephew as the star witness. The boy told the court how his uncle had sexually abused his victims and then beat them to death. Northcott defended himself and for some reason refused to plead any kind of insanity defense despite two psychiatrist’s opinion that he was mentally deranged. Subsequently found guilty, the child-killer was sentenced to death and hung on October 2, 1930. Northcott’s nephew was set free in exchange for his testimony while Northcott’s mother, Sarah, was sentenced to life for assisting in one of the murders. Northcott eventually broke down just before his death and claimed to have murdered twenty little boys, though it should be noted that he had made several similar statements proved to be false.

serial-killers-101:

Gordon Northcott

In February of 1928 the headless corpse of a small boy was discovered in a ditch in Puente, California. When two more Mexican boys, brothers aged eight and ten, went missing later that spring, investigators soon focused on Gordon Northcott. The ranchowner from Riverside made his guilt obvious by immediately fleeing to Canada. Police found the head of the boy found in Puente during their search of Northcott’s isolated home and soon arrested his teenaged nephew and his mother, Sarah, both of whom admitted assisting Northcott with the crimes. 

Found and extradited back to the US, Northcott went to trial with his nephew as the star witness. The boy told the court how his uncle had sexually abused his victims and then beat them to death. Northcott defended himself and for some reason refused to plead any kind of insanity defense despite two psychiatrist’s opinion that he was mentally deranged. Subsequently found guilty, the child-killer was sentenced to death and hung on October 2, 1930. 

Northcott’s nephew was set free in exchange for his testimony while Northcott’s mother, Sarah, was sentenced to life for assisting in one of the murders. Northcott eventually broke down just before his death and claimed to have murdered twenty little boys, though it should be noted that he had made several similar statements proved to be false.

(via true-crime-101)

Thursday Apr 19 @ 10:31pm with 167 notes


serialkillerobsessed:

“Well-meaning, decent people will condemn the behavior of a Ted Bundy, while they’re walking past a magazine rack full of the very kinds of things that send young kids down the road to be Ted Bundys.”

serialkillerobsessed:

“Well-meaning, decent people will condemn the behavior of a Ted Bundy, while they’re walking past a magazine rack full of the very kinds of things that send young kids down the road to be Ted Bundys.”

Wednesday Apr 18 @ 10:33pm with 378 notes



coldbloodcoldheart:

On the morning of April 12, 1981, 14-year old Sheila Sharp left a next-door sleepover and returned to Cabin 28 at the popular Keddie Resort, where her family had been living for the past two months. What she found there would cast a permanent shadow over this bucolic vacation spot in the northern Sierra Nevadas of California. The walls and furniture had been destroyed and were covered with blood. Amid the chaos were the bound, mutilated and nearly unrecognizable bodies of her mother Glenna Susan “Sue” Sharp, 36, her brother John, 16, and his friend Dana Wingate, 17. Her sister Tina, 13 was missing; three younger children, her two other brothers and their friend, were unharmed in another room.

John Sharp and Dana Wingate had hitchhiked to Keddie from Quincy, Calif., the night before, possibly after a party. Either awaiting them, accompanying them, or soon to follow them were the killers, who used duct tape and electrical wire to truss Sue, John and Dana Wingate, as well as Tina Sharp. Then, over the course of ten hours, the killers brutally attacked the group—and their surroundings—with steak knives and a claw hammer. The next cabin was a mere 15 feet away, but neighbors and passersby didn’t hear a thing.

Tina Sharp wasn’t there when police arrived, but subsequent investigation showed that she had been there part of the night. The friend who’d been in the other room was able to convince police that Tina had indeed been there, and helped them determine that there had been two assailants and put together sketches of the pair. The killers were never caught. Some think the neighbors who’d invited Susan Sharp to a bar that night (she declined) were involved—the list of accusers at one time included one of the men’s own wife. Other locals whisper about Satanic worship; yet others suggest there was a drug connection, either through the two young men or in a case of mistaken identity.

In a gruesome coda, Tina’s head was found three years later near a waterfall fifty miles down the hill. The case has never been solved.

The once-welcoming Keddie Cabins would subsequently fall into disrepair. Longtime owner, Gary Mollath, tried to sell the place and renovated it, but the tragedy made the once-beautiful place unattractive. After a period of decay and infestation by squatters, he again rented some of the cabins, but Cabin 28 remained empty, becoming the object of rumors of hauntings. Locals say they’ve heard moans and the sound of slamming doors from the abandoned building and seen shadowy figures. Mollath’s stepdaughter recounts once seeing the word “no” scrawled on the house’s door, with a pitchfork propped beside it—the next day, both the writing and the tool were gone. In 2004, Mollath razed Cabin 28.

(via criminalprofiler)


Tuesday Apr 17 @ 10:30pm with 134 notes



(via tedbunny)

Monday Apr 16 @ 10:30pm with 130 notes


ramirezdahmerbundy:

‘The Chicago Rippers’ terrorised the city between May 1981 and October 1982 and may have claimed as many as 18 lives. The rippers were four men: Robin Gecht, Ed Spreitzer and Andrew and Tommy Kokoraleis. The gang abducted women, raped them, strangled them to death and then mutilated and cannibalised parts of their bodies. On 6 October 1982 Beverly Washington, a 20-year-old prostitute, fell victim to the Rippers, but survived and was found barely alive by the police. She had been raped and slashed and her left breast had been removed - one of the gang’s signatures. She was able to give the police a good description of the men and while following this lead they found Gecht’s trophy case, which housed the amputated breasts of his victims, parts of which had been eaten. Gecht was given 120 years; Thomas Kokoraleis was given 70 years, whilst his brother Andrew and Spreitzer were condemned to death. Andrew Kokoraleis was the first to be executed on 17 March 1999, but in January 2003 Spreitzer’s death sentence was reduced to life without the possibility of parole. Thomas Kokoraleis had been a key witness in damming the rest of the men and as a result had received the lowest of all the sentences.

ramirezdahmerbundy:

‘The Chicago Rippers’ terrorised the city between May 1981 and October 1982 and may have claimed as many as 18 lives. The rippers were four men: Robin Gecht, Ed Spreitzer and Andrew and Tommy Kokoraleis. The gang abducted women, raped them, strangled them to death and then mutilated and cannibalised parts of their bodies. On 6 October 1982 Beverly Washington, a 20-year-old prostitute, fell victim to the Rippers, but survived and was found barely alive by the police. She had been raped and slashed and her left breast had been removed - one of the gang’s signatures. She was able to give the police a good description of the men and while following this lead they found Gecht’s trophy case, which housed the amputated breasts of his victims, parts of which had been eaten. Gecht was given 120 years; Thomas Kokoraleis was given 70 years, whilst his brother Andrew and Spreitzer were condemned to death. Andrew Kokoraleis was the first to be executed on 17 March 1999, but in January 2003 Spreitzer’s death sentence was reduced to life without the possibility of parole. Thomas Kokoraleis had been a key witness in damming the rest of the men and as a result had received the lowest of all the sentences.

Sunday Apr 15 @ 10:29pm with 104 notes



(Source: richard-fucking-ramirez)

Saturday Apr 14 @ 10:29pm with 294 notes



The state of Florida has no problem at all letting bad guys ride the lightening. And it may well be that Ted Bundy, one of the most infamous serial murderers of this century, wanted to ride it-at least subconsciously. Consider this 1976 conversation Bundy has with his lawyer while ine jail in Aspen, Colorado, on multiple murder charges, as reported in Bundy: The Deliberate Stanger, by Richard W. Larsen:
“What’s going on with executions now?” Ted asked. “Where are people most likely to be exeuted now?”
“I suppose it might be Georgia….No,” Bundy’s lawyer corrected himself. “It’d probably be Florida now.”
“Florida?” replied Bundy.
The lawyer said the constitutionality of Florida’s death penalty had recently been upheld by the U.S Supreme Court.
“Florida,” murmured Bundy, “Florida Hmmmm.”
It makes you wonder, then, why knowing this, Ted Bundy would travel all the way across the country from Florida to kill somebody. Why not the other forty-nine states, where he was less likely to be executed?

The state of Florida has no problem at all letting bad guys ride the lightening. And it may well be that Ted Bundy, one of the most infamous serial murderers of this century, wanted to ride it-at least subconsciously. Consider this 1976 conversation Bundy has with his lawyer while ine jail in Aspen, Colorado, on multiple murder charges, as reported in Bundy: The Deliberate Stanger, by Richard W. Larsen:

“What’s going on with executions now?” Ted asked. “Where are people most likely to be exeuted now?”

“I suppose it might be Georgia….No,” Bundy’s lawyer corrected himself. “It’d probably be Florida now.”

“Florida?” replied Bundy.

The lawyer said the constitutionality of Florida’s death penalty had recently been upheld by the U.S Supreme Court.

“Florida,” murmured Bundy, “Florida Hmmmm.”

It makes you wonder, then, why knowing this, Ted Bundy would travel all the way across the country from Florida to kill somebody. Why not the other forty-nine states, where he was less likely to be executed?

(via your-average-serial-killer)

Friday Apr 13 @ 10:29pm with 84 notes


He is just totally consumed with murder all the time. King County Detective Robert D. Keppel, on Ted Bundy (via thethorninhisside)

(via bunnybundy)


Thursday Apr 12 @ 10:35pm with 25 notes